Biography

Jona Hoier, born in 1982 in Graz, he graduated in the Interaction and Mediadesign program at the University of Applied Sciences in 2005. In 2001 he co-founded the artist collective sofa23. He is following a Masters in Interface Cultures at the Art University Linz. 2008 he took part in the residency program of the Institute of Advanced Media, Arts and Sciences – Japan. From 2008 to 2010 Jona worked for the Ars Electronica Futurelab as a researcher and project manager. In 2010 Jona founded his own studio “Jona Hoier Media Art & Design” and since 2012 he is as well teaching at the school of art & design Ortweinschule and the FH-Joanneum. Jona works with various collaborators in the intersection of art, design and research.

Jona is working in the field of new media art and design as a creative engineer, designer and video artist. His works have been awarded several times and shown at international exhibitions including Ars Electronica Linz,  Diagonale, DMY Berlin, FILE Festival Sao Paulo, Istanbul Design Biennial and Saatchi Gallery London.

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Exhibition List

2015

  • Sound of Uhrturm, Stadtmuseum, Graz (Austria)
  • Banana Period, Ernst-von-Glasersfeld-Archiv, Innsbruck (Austria)

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

  • heat, AEC, Linz
  • sing in, Display – Degree Show, Medienturm, Graz

2005

  • nilreb,Dieselwall Competition, Berlin
  • Morgensterne, Display – Degree Show, Medienturm, Graz
  • Styriarte Videoteaser, Public Screen Jakominiplatz, Graz

2004

2003

  • ampel, Steirischer Herbst, Graz
  • frühlingsrolle, La Strada, Graz
  • frühlingsrolle, TaO!, Graz
  • minials, Netdays Austria, Radiokulturhaus Vienna
  • +aufkreuzen, Diagonale – Shorts on Screen, Graz
  • 3DMS, GameArt 04, Völklingen (Germany)

2002

  • minials, Festival Ars Electronica, OK Zentrum, Linz

Contact

E: write [AT] jonahoier [DOT] net
T: @jonano
F: Jona Hoier

Jona Hoier Media Art & Design
Volkertplatz 1/2
1020 Wien

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Cerebral Hut

Cerebral Hut is a kinetic installation that works with an interface that measures brain frequencies and turns them into a reactive environment and explores the relationship between architecture, movement and human thought.

We traditionally assume that the built environment, whether in the architectural or the urban scale influences our psyche. What if we can reverse that relationship? What if a kinetic architecture could establish a direct connection between the thoughts of its user and itself in order to reconfigure its physical boundaries accordingly?

In order to create a space that is reactive to brain activity, the team hacked a commercially available device that can measure concentration levels and blinking, interpreted these data thresholds and wrote scripts that would translate them into motion. A research on different folding patterns and geometric structures lead to the creation of an environment that can act as a vessel for movement. As a result, Cerebral Hut became a game-space where the user controls the physical boundaries of his environment by his thoughts. As the user engages in activities that increases concentration levels, such as imagining movement, the environment responds real time and changes its configuration. Cerebral Hut plugs into a vein of contemporary research that explores kinetic environments and the relationship between technology, movement and space, but it is the first of its kind that creates a moving architecture that directly responds to human thought. And consequently it creates a collective architectural form, which questions the static notions of space and conclusive perceptions of design. The Cerebral Hut has no final, or ideal design-form, its interior and exterior is in constant transformation triggered by user participation.

Credits

Design, Research: Guvenc Ozel, Alexandr Karaivanov
Programming, Mechanical Design: Jona Hoier, Peter Innerhofer
Installation Team: Guvenc Ozel, Alexandr Karaivanov, Lena Krivanek, Peter Innerhofer
Administrative Support: Alexandra Graupner, Sabine Peternell

Special Thanks to: Greg Lynn, Gerald Bast, Klaus Bollinger, Esra Kahveci, Onur
Sönmez, Markus Murschitz

Cerebral Hut

Cerebral Hut is a kinetic installation that works with an interface that measures brain frequencies and turns them into a reactive environment and explores the relationship between architecture, movement and human thought.

We traditionally assume that the built environment, whether in the architectural or the urban scale influences our psyche. What if we can reverse that relationship? What if a kinetic architecture could establish a direct connection between the thoughts of its user and itself in order to reconfigure its physical boundaries accordingly?

In order to create a space that is reactive to brain activity, the team hacked a commercially available device that can measure concentration levels and blinking, interpreted these data thresholds and wrote scripts that would translate them into motion. A research on different folding patterns and geometric structures lead to the creation of an environment that can act as a vessel for movement. As a result, Cerebral Hut became a game-space where the user controls the physical boundaries of his environment by his thoughts. As the user engages in activities that increases concentration levels, such as imagining movement, the environment responds real time and changes its configuration. Cerebral Hut plugs into a vein of contemporary research that explores kinetic environments and the relationship between technology, movement and space, but it is the first of its kind that creates a moving architecture that directly responds to human thought. And consequently it creates a collective architectural form, which questions the static notions of space and conclusive perceptions of design. The Cerebral Hut has no final, or ideal design-form, its interior and exterior is in constant transformation triggered by user participation.

Credits

Design, Research: Guvenc Ozel, Alexandr Karaivanov
Programming, Mechanical Design: Jona Hoier, Peter Innerhofer
Installation Team: Guvenc Ozel, Alexandr Karaivanov, Lena Krivanek, Peter Innerhofer
Administrative Support: Alexandra Graupner, Sabine Peternell

Special Thanks to: Greg Lynn, Gerald Bast, Klaus Bollinger, Esra Kahveci, Onur
Sönmez, Markus Murschitz